Website Review: AllRecipes

AllRecipes

Allrecipes states that “what started with a single cookie recipe has grown organically to become the world’s largest food-focused social network with a community of 85 million home cooks consuming 3 billion pages annually of food inspiration across our 19 sites serving 24 countries in 12 languages. I invite you to join our one-of-a-kind community that inspires home cooking and celebrates the foods we make with friends, family, brands and followers. Calling all cooks!” They offer free apps for your devices, videos, and an ingredient search engine to find recipes for what you have on hand.

Oven Stew

Oven Stew

This is a wonderful dish to serve on a cold winter’s day, made even better if followed up with a chair nap.

Ingredients

Chuck roast, whole or cubed

Potatoes, quartered or diced

Carrots, sliced or chunked

Celery, sliced

Onion, diced

Tomatoes, sliced

Layer all of the above in the order listed around the roast in a dutch oven. Add a couple of cups of water then the following on top:

Mushrooms

Salt and Pepper

Basil

Tapioca (4 tsp)

Bake at 250 degrees for four hours. Serve with warm buttered bread.

True Love

With You By David Jacobi

“Love is real only when a person can sacrifice himself for another person. Only when a person forgets himself for the sake of another, and lives for another creature, only this kind of love can be called true love, and only in this love do we see the blessing and reward of life. This is the foundation of the world.” Leo Tolstoy

The Roundup

Winter Wheel By David Jacobi

Many Tracks is the online home for Sue Robishaw and Steve Schmeck, who “live and work in our home, studio, and shop in the northwoods of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Our art, our work, our lives, and our play interweave and blend to such a degree that it is often hard to tell where one ends and the other begins, which is how we like it to be. Our interest in a sustainable lifestyle and world permeates our life and work. The sun provides our electricity, the wind pumps our water, and the woods and the sun heat our home and cook our food. We strive to live a non-disposable life.” Take some time to explore their site.

Inspired by 1950’s paint-by-number kits, Easy 123 Art, Inc. creates custom paint by number products generated from digital photographs. Visit the site to see how it works.

Popular Science in some form has been around for over 140 years. The website offers easy reading on science topics for those of us who are not scientists.

The Dollar Stretcher is one of my favorite personal finance sites. It has been around since 1996 and continues to offer timely, well written articles. From the About Us page: “While all of our articles can help you live better for less, some are more about personal finance topics that can help you gain control of your finances and build wealth. And then we have our frugal living articles that can help you do just about anything for less money, such as remodel your kitchen, take a much needed vacation, or feed your family for less.” Founder Gary Foreman was gracious enough to write several guest posts for a previous blog of mine, which you can read here.

Have a good weekend!

My Brother

Sunset By Mike Jacobi

We are looking for a drink

And a bite to eat

Into the bar we go

It’s been years since we were here

Everything is different

Moved around, changed

Except the bar and stools

And the huge mirror behind them

Waiting for us

The bartender steps up

And he looks like a caveman

With a 1964 Beatle haircut he is

Shocking, ugly and proud

My brother chuckles

I know something is coming

As the bartender stands there

Hands us menus

My brother, analyzing him…

Here it comes…

“Are you related to a gorilla?”

“Agorilla?”

“Yeah.”

“I don’t think so.”

“Are you sure?”

“Yes, pretty sure.”

“Okay, I think we’re ready to order then.”

The gorilla smiles

We place our order

2011 By David Jacobi

The Drive-In Experience

Early 1970’s Des Moines newspaper ad for drive-in movies

When I was growing up in Des Moines, Iowa there were drive-in theaters on every side of the city, north, south, east and west. Which one to go watch movies at on a Friday or Saturday night depended on what was playing, the cost, your previous experiences at a given theater (could the place get rowdy, did most of the speakers work, was the concession stand cheap and tasty) and the quality of the playground equipment at the foot of the giant screen for those with kids. Many times a summer movie night at the drive-in would last well into the early morning because of the late starting time (around sunset) and the line up could include previews, a cartoon or two, a kids movie and then the adult double features, which sometimes was extended to three or four movies. Once kids grew bored with the adult movies and had annoyed their parents enough from the back seat of the car they were sent off to the midnight playground. This was a special treat for most, out playing with kids you had never met before, would never see again, under the stars late at night in front of a gigantic screen showing a movie you could not hear. My mom would cook up several batches of popcorn on the stove top and dump it in a paper bag along with melted butter and salt to take with us to the drive-in. Shelly and I had our first date at a drive-in, then went to several more as our romance blossomed. Whether you have experienced a drive-in or not there is still a chance to do so today. Check out DriveInMovie.com to see if one of the few surviving theaters is close to you.